The European Union is today a remarkable example of free trade. The Member States form an essentially unlimited unit for the purposes of trade and the introduction of the euro by most of these nations paves the way. It should be noted that this system is regulated by a Brussels-based bureaucracy, which has to deal with the many trade-related issues that arise between representatives of the Member States. Unlike a customs union, parties to a free trade agreement do not have common external tariffs, which means that they apply different tariffs and other directives to non-members. This feature allows non-parties to obtain footsp preferences under a free trade agreement by entering the market with the lowest external tariffs. .